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What is SongwriterTribe?

Hello and welcome.

About a year ago, I started a journey of personal expression. I have been a life-long musician, but while I composed music for bands I was in when I was young, the few attempts at writing complete songs with lyrics were pretty awful. So awful, I avoided any further attempts for a very long time.

A couple of years ago, I made some attempts to write songs, but did not put much time in, and after two years had four songs. So about a year ago I decided to make a more concerted effort at focusing on songwriting as a practical skill. There were a number of things influencing this, and those will be the subject of some future posts.

So last January, I reviewed the songs I had, decided to revise two and put two “away”, and moved forward with songwriting exercises. What had been a nearly impossible and seemingly daunting task became more and more “doable”. In the coming week, I will be doing some “organizing” and will have a count of songs written this year.

One aspect of songwriting that has become clear over the course of the year: songwriters are a special kind of person and it’s beneficial to connect with other songwriters because of this.

So, I spent a year “woodshedding”, but now it’s time to step out and share what I learned, what I have accomplished, and what I am doing, and hopefully songwriters out there will find it interesting and useful, and feel inspired to write songs (and comment, and share the blog, etc..).

If you want to check out some of my music see these sites:

My ReverbNation Profile:

 

Or check out some of my work recordings along with officially released songs on SoundClound:

Common Man Blues

Common Man Blues is completed!

Stream all tracks free, buy downloads, and share with your friends!

Common Man Blues

Or stream/buy/share from my website: 

http://jbakervt.com/#music

Coming soon to your favorite streaming service!

How do you get your music? Let us know in the comments!

Look for announcements as each of these streaming services or stores go live with Common Man Blues!

Want a CD? There will be CDs!

Very excited to be working with Discmakers from my old home state of New Jersey to produce CDs for this album. Look for an announcement here, on Facebook or Instagram, or sign up for my mailing list.

Interview in Lifoti Magazine!

Lifoti is music related magazine mostly focus on Music Entertainment, lifestyle and sport news.

Lifoti Magazine has published, in September 2019 Issue 09, an article talking about my musical roots and my new album, Common Man Blues!

Jason Baker combines folk, punk, rap, and blues to talk about America.

http://www.lifoti.com/2019/10/jason-baker-combines-folk-punk-rap-and.html

Note: the article says “due out in September”…

…but the title track is still being mixed! Most of the album is available online for streaming from my website now, and the whole thing will be sent for digital distribution and CD pressing when the title track is ready! Look for an update here over the weekend. In the meantime have a listen!

https://www.reverbnation.com/jbakervt/album/234178-common-man-blues

 

Almost finished!

This album is almost ready!

Had a second recording session at Leilani Sound Studios. Overdubbed backing vocals and additional instruments for three of the tunes.

Rik Palieri, Jason Baker and engineer Calvin Lane at Leilani Sound Studios

Fabulous Guest Musicians!

Two of these songs were blessed with the talents of a couple of friends of mine who happen to be fantastic musicians: folk troubadour Rik Palieri and Burlington songwriter Janice Russotti.

Rik Palieri, Jason Baker and Janice Russotti

“We Don’t Know Any Better”

On this song Rik played his banjo ukulele, kazoo and joined the backing vocals as well. Rik said “This is the first time I have ever made a recording with the banjo uke!” He really gave it his all, and the kazoo work was equally memorable.

Rik Palieri playing the Banjo Uke!

Janice added a clever, subtle harmony to the chorus and it really completes the song. We had a lot of fun recording this.

Janice Russotti harmonizing!

“Let’s Fight The Sun”

This song was inspired by a passing Facebook comment about plans by MIT, Bill Gates, and others to work together to solve the problem of climate change by figuring out a way to block the sun.

Janice played Rik’s old tambourine on this track, and it broke apart! You can hear this instruments’ last performance on this track.

I was going to add a ukulele to the track, but Rik offered to play banjo! The results sound great to me, way better than the uke would have.

Rik Palieri and his amazing banjo!

Janice, Rik and I formed a chorus for the backing vocals, and it all worked out even better than I had imagined.

Jason Baker, Janice Russotti, and Rik Palieri sing together.

Waiting on the mix…

So the final mixdown was delayed due to the engineer becoming ill, but I have word the mix is imminent, so I am hoping in just a few days I can announce the official release of Common Man Blues.

Speaking of the title track…

Common Man Blues
Common Man Blues by Jason Baker

“Common Man Blues” also got another overdub (in addition to the vocals and harmonica). Rik lent me a resonator guitar, and I have been practicing my Open G tuning. Didn’t get to show off much here, just added for some atmosphere really, but it works well for the song.

This song exists because of another great musician and his contribution to the early development of this work. Legendary Jazz pianist and composer David Amram was gracious enough to work on this song with me, as part of his interest in re-thinking and re-visiting the 12-bar blues form.

David Amram and Jason Baker at NERFA 2018

Look for my album announcement shortly!

Getting it on tape

Metaphorically of course…

It’s just an expression, since most recording is done digitally onto hard drive space in or connected to a computer. Yes, I got some studio time this weekend and recorded!

Nice studio: Leilani Sound Studios

Calvin, the sound engineer I worked with, has done sound with me before, so that helped. The studio itself is small but neat and comfortable. After a quick setup, we were off recording live takes to start.

Four songs, four approaches:

  1. Strictly a live take, no overdubs, pretty much done.
  2. Done in parts and cut together, with vocals and harmonica overdubbed, still needs a slide part overdubbed.
  3. A live take, harmonica overdubbed, will need various overdubs for rythym instruments and lots of backing vocals.
  4. Several live takes cut together, will either get overdubbed by a special guest or we may try a live take.

Crunch time next weekend

All those final overdubs need to be done next weekend. That’s a bit of pressure, but sometimes that can be good for getting things done.

Your thoughts welcomed in comments!

You are invited…

Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday this week.

Of interest to songwriters (but open to all):

Burlington Songwriters meeting is Tuesday, August 27th at 7 PM at 20 Allen Street, Burlington, VT in the Community Room on the 2nd Floor. Open to all, this meeting is primarily for the purpose of sharing works for feedback.

Of general interest:

Denny Bean and Bob Devins on Wednesday August 28th at 6:30 PM at The Double E Performance Center 21 Essex Way in Essex Junction, VT

Jason Baker on Friday, August 30th at 5 PM at Gusto’s Bar, 28 Prospect Street in Barre, VT. I will play a two hour set. Come on by after work!

To Gig, or Not To Gig…

Are all gigs “good” gigs?

(TL/DR: SEND ME GIG IDEAS PLEASE!)

So, obviously, no… some gigs are in places that are hard to get to, difficult to load in, cramped to set up and/or lacking in walk-by traffic. Some places the staff isn’t nice or it’s just not a great experience for the performer for one reason or another.

Many times it’s the fact that it doesn’t pay. Other times, it might pay, but no one is listening, or worse, people are talking loudly over your playing and singing. These are the most common “problems” for a performing artist who is doing their own original material. So…

Is it better to be heard or paid?

Instead of saying this is an intractible debate, I will come down firmly on the side of being heard. Playing 2 or 3 songs at an open mic where there is an attentive audience seems far more personally rewarding than playing 2 hours and getting paid for it, but having no one listen or care at all.

That said, it sucks to play for no money, and tips are NOT typically enough to make it worth it (there are some venues that do more than others to help solicit tips for musicians, through on-table tip containers and reminders for example).

Since I feel that “people hearing the songs” is an important measure of success to me, I guess it makes sense that I feel getting heard matters most.

How does gigging meet your goals?

So, when you talk to a musician who earns their living on the road gigging, they will tell you they are playing well over 200 shows a year. They make a living that way, but they CAN’T reduce that schedule without doing something else to take it’s place: teaching music, etc.

I figure I am not likely to ever make enough money to make a living at this, even if I could get booked for 230 nights in the next year, as my costs are more than just supporting me: wife and two kids, mortgage and credit card debt. Not likely to make enough money as a touring musician at my age.

So, why am I bothering to perform at all? I guess it’s just about trying to communicate with people around me and make some kind of connection to a larger community. I am always hoping people will listen to the lyrics of the song and “get it”. When people do, and they like it, that is very important to me emotionally

Is gigging a worthy goal on it’s own?

Well, in the sense that playing music is good for you and fun, one could suppose that any gig, at least any gig that doesn’t have serious problems or red flags, is better than no gig. Getting practice on stage, even in front of a disinterested room, is still experience and helps make you a better musician.

If the hassle factor of the gig is causing more stress than is relieved by playing music (or getting paid), then it’s probably not worth doing again. If there is no pay and no audience, you may legitimately wonder what is up with the venue. They may just not be “happening” as a business, or it may be they are just developing their local scene, and you can help. Use some common sense: not much will fix a lousy location or no positive proximity to other businesses, institutions and amenities.

Reach that one ear

Many gigs will seem questionable or tiresome, but if you love playing music then you can focus on doing that and maybe, just maybe, if you do a good job and are well-prepared, you will reach one person with one song, even just catching their ear for a few seconds. It probably won’t change the world, or even their life, but then again, when it comes to how songs work, the truth is you never know.

Pay to play sucks

There are some legitimate times when sharing the cost of production makes sense, but for the most part, there are now a lot of “Pay-to-Play” scenarios out there that seem strictly predatory: pay for gauranteed review placement or getting included on a playlist is standard. Paying to play at anything other than an industry showcase is probably a rip-off.

I want gigs

I am open to all kinds of gigs, so send me what you got! Looking for New England, New York, Mid-Atlantic, and possibly Eastern Canada. Ideal: a listening room. Good: a bar or restaurant that pays. OK: a place that pays tips only. Also: I do originals and many songs have political content.

Feel free to leave suggestions in the comments! THANKS!

A Common Blues, man

You know what’s not easy to do? Record an album with no money!

I want to finish recording an album but I really don’t have any money. Being a contractor I only get paid while at work and having a heart attack precluded that last week.

On the bright side, I am more than halfway done.

All songs are written.

7 of them have been recorded in some fashion:

2 in my home studio, 5 at Robot Dog Studios, due to the generosity of DJ/Blogger Tim Lewis and the studio.

Three to go, well, four…

So I am considering re-recording one song, as the arrangement has already changed slightly.

Otherwise I have three songs ready, but dread putting a home recording up against the Robot Dog stuff (the two I have are done with just enough reverb and overdubs to slide by, I think. May have to ask for an impartial opinion).

I have selected which song to use as the title track: “Common Man Blues”, a song loosely inspired by Aaron Copland’s “Fanfare for the Common Man”. I even have cover art ready.

Digital distribution is already paid for, sending my stuff to YouTube, Apple Music, Spotify and more. See those links to hear what I already have online.

Ok, but how to get there?

So I am considering how to fund recording the rest of the album, and possibly funding a run of CDs.

Should I even bother with CDs?

Should I try a Kickstarter campaign? Or some other way of crowd funding?

In truth, any suggestions are welcome folks.

Comment on this post to let me know your ideas.

My heart is broken…

Literally. I had a heart attack last week.

I don’t normally talk about the details of my personal life much on here, but as you can see if you look, I have been absent from here a while. I felt too busy to take time to write, with a variety of things happening that were already pretty challenging.

So, now, I am feeling that if I don’t make time to do the things I know I want to, like communicate to the world about my journey as a songwriter here, well I might just run out of time.

Before we get too dramatic, here are the details:

  • I awoke early Monday morning with severe aching pain in both my arms, shoulders and back, and felt dizzy. I suspected heart trouble and took aspirin, but when the symptoms did not subside after an hour and a half, I ended up in the emergency room.
  • I did not have a blockage, as would be likely in these situations. Instead, I have a dissection, a tear in an artery, and that it not something you can quite repair. It will take genetic testing to try to figure out the cause.
  • The treatment is to keep my blood pressure low, and so far that is it, just taking the medications and getting used to them (they can make you dizzy). I will be living a “heart-healthy” lifestyle from now on.

So, what does this mean for my music schedule?

  • No gigs were impacted by this, although I missed Songsters night at Lamp Club Light Shop that night.
  • I am still scheduled for two hour gigs at Gusto’s Bar in Barre on August 30th, September 27th and October 26th. Radio Bean is October 3rd.
  • I was invited back to The Open Door in Hillsborough, New Hampshire for a 15 minute spot. I ended up signing up for April 2020, as I saw my friends Dan & Faith will be headlining.
  • I am more determined than ever to complete the recording of the final songs selected for my next release, Common Man Blues. More on this in my next posts.
  • I will be doing as many open mics as possible.

Keep trying, before we are dying…

I am also trying, once again, to re-commit to this blog and try to make it relevant to what’s happening for me musically. I hope you feel free to comment on any post new or old, write me with feedback or suggestions, link and repost anything here.

Note: I did write a song since facing death, and it’s about the fear of death of course! Not sure it’s all that great a song… 😉

Talk to you again soon,

Jason Baker

Gigs and open mics

Burlington Songwriters Open Mic 4/9/2019

Burlington Songwriters held the first open mic in our new home at 20 Allen Street in Burlington’s Old North End, also now called the Old North End Community Center. I set up the tiny house P.A. and started us off with “Old Time Breakdown” and then tried a new song I haven’t recorded yet called “Highway 9”. Other members also shared original songs and we also had ice cream sodas! 

Radio Bean 4/11/2019

Radio Bean shows are interesting, as the audience rotates in and out quite a bit during the 7 PM hour. The staff now do recognize me and remember my name (although I wasn’t listed on the inside chalkboard!) and are very gracious. All in all, people are appreciative and I made $18 in tips.

Moretown Open Mic 4/12/2019

I happened to see a “call for performers” in the classified ad section on the Vermont Arts Council page for an open mic in Moretown at the old Town Hall. This event would be the closing event of their 3rd season of Moretown Open Mic. I called the number to see if they still had space for performers, and got a return call later that day from Jay Saffran, who is one of the organizers. He asked me if I would play an extended set! I was kind of surprised, but certainly flattered, and said I would.

When I got there, I was immediately charmed by the building itself, which has a lovely wood-floored main space with a raised “stage” framed with arches. I was equally charmed by the lovely people of Moretown, who displayed their own considerable talents, including storytelling, songwriting, singing and playing guitar, ballet dancing, poetry and more. Jay graciously introduced me as a “featured guest” and I played about a half hour or so in the middle of things. I decided to forgo the amplification and stand as close as possible to the audience of about 20 people, in a really nice “listening room” kind of setting. The old Town Hall has wonderful natural reverb and it really was nice to hear the folks singing along in there! They take summer off, but the Moretown Open Mic will be back in September.

El Toro 4/13/2019

El Toro was even busier than the last time I played there, which I wasn’t sure was possible!

They had a steady crowd for dinner and drinks, and I had to work to be heard with no amplification, which was requested by El Toro so the waitstaff can hear customers and be heard. They do sell food after all… really, really good food. MMMMMM….

Lucky for me they fed me dinner, and it was awesome! After that I set up in the front corner and played most of “America Dreams” and then a good helping of new songs and other material I have never recorded. Tips for the night: $22.

 

Review of America Dreams in Issues Magazine #26

I am pleased to announce a review of my album America Dreams has been published in Issues Magazine #26.

Here is the text of the review:

This is a traditional folk album with a slightly jaunty twist in the music.

The lyrics are political and generally left wing. They lend to be long-form slow-motion tirades against greed, apathy and injustice.

Jason sings well. He hits the pitch correctly and on time.

The approach is ironically quite conservative, but then again, folk music is all about tradition so that makes sense.

The songs have a bouncy rhythm. They’re made up exclusively of voice and acoustic guitar.

If you like folk check it out.

Download Issues Magazine #26

Thanks to Issues Magazine for the review!